It’s a Greek Summer with a cookbook review  of Debbie Matenopoulos’s It’s All Greek to Me via Parade.com. Read the review and get the recipe for Lemonates Patates (Lemon Potatoes), a delicious dish of potatoes baked in a mustard and lemon sauce.  

"Fairtrade is not the magic cure-all for poverty, but farmers have pride in knowing that clean water wells, the classroom for their children, and the roadway giving easier access to the port, were paid for through their efforts to produce quality products."

Harriet Lamb, CEO of Fairtrade International, on revising her book ‘Fighting the Banana Wars and Other Fairtrade Battles’. Order the new edition here.

Read Harriet’s full commentary on the process at the Guardian.

(via fairtrade)

Tags: word


Few Americans identify slavery with the cultivation of rice, yet rice was a major plantation crop during the first three centuries of settlement in the Americas. Rice accompanied African slaves across the Middle Passage throughout the New World to Brazil, the Caribbean, and the southern United States. By the middle of the eighteenth century, rice plantations in South Carolina and the black slaves who worked them had created one of the most profitable economies in the world.
Black Rice tells the story of the true provenance of rice in the Americas. It establishes, through agricultural and historical evidence, the vital significance of rice in West African society for a millennium before Europeans arrived and the slave trade began. The standard belief that Europeans introduced rice to West Africa and then brought the knowledge of its cultivation to the Americas is a fundamental fallacy, one which succeeds in effacing the origins of the crop and the role of Africans and African-American slaves in transferring the seed, the cultivation skills, and the cultural practices necessary for establishing it in the New World.
In this vivid interpretation of rice and slaves in the Atlantic world, Judith Carney reveals how racism has shaped our historical memory and neglected this critical African contribution to the making of the Americas.

Few Americans identify slavery with the cultivation of rice, yet rice was a major plantation crop during the first three centuries of settlement in the Americas. Rice accompanied African slaves across the Middle Passage throughout the New World to Brazil, the Caribbean, and the southern United States. By the middle of the eighteenth century, rice plantations in South Carolina and the black slaves who worked them had created one of the most profitable economies in the world.

Black Rice tells the story of the true provenance of rice in the Americas. It establishes, through agricultural and historical evidence, the vital significance of rice in West African society for a millennium before Europeans arrived and the slave trade began. The standard belief that Europeans introduced rice to West Africa and then brought the knowledge of its cultivation to the Americas is a fundamental fallacy, one which succeeds in effacing the origins of the crop and the role of Africans and African-American slaves in transferring the seed, the cultivation skills, and the cultural practices necessary for establishing it in the New World.

In this vivid interpretation of rice and slaves in the Atlantic world, Judith Carney reveals how racism has shaped our historical memory and neglected this critical African contribution to the making of the Americas.

(Source: amazon.com, via jessehimself)

"…Eat less and Exercise more…." Follow Mom’s harsh and sweet advice and enjoy these potassium and protein-rich Coconut Pancakes with a fresh Fruit Salad of mangoes, oranges, bananas and toasted coconut and smear of Tonewood’s Maple Cream.

Is the last Crumbs Bake Shop Cupcake worth $225? Manage priorities by donating to  CAMBA, one of ‪Brooklyn‬’s largest #nonprofit organizations that help people in need. To donate and learn more, visit here.

Is the last Crumbs Bake Shop Cupcake worth $225? Manage priorities by donating to  CAMBA, one of ‪Brooklyn‬’s largest #nonprofit organizations that help people in need. To donate and learn more, visit here.

What a sweet day this was… Received a delivery of So Delicious Dairy Free new Coconut Milk Ice Cream and organic mini bars that are low in sugar and/or gluten-free. The new line comes in 12 flavors. Which flavor do you want to try?

Had a delicious time w/ Whole Foods Market in Brooklyn to celebrate their Cherry Festival (Pssst: A little birdie told me cherries are on sale at Whole Foods Market this Friday, July 11, 2014 for $1.99/lb.)

Adapting to Less Time: There’s less time for shopping for groceries and cooking meals, but a Harissa Tomato Sauce with Roast Shrimp, Asparagus and Chickpeas Pasta dish is an effortless weekday recipe within a weekly menu plan and with weekend prep work. Read more to get the recipe.

"Oh sure, you can never get too old to wear fancy stuff."

It’s a few weeks before her 115th birthday, on July 6, and Jones is spending time with family in her Brooklyn, New York, living room. Jones is the second-oldest American, according to the roster of supercentenarians validated by the Gerontology Research Group, and her niece, Lois Judge, 74, is trying to remind her of that fact.

http://time.com/2873247/second-oldest-american-115-birthday/

Tags: inspiration